Gemstone Library

 

Sapphire

The ancient Persians believed the earth rests on a giant sapphire. Its reflection, they said, made the sky blue. Sapphire comes from the Greek word for blue, sappheiros, and this gem provides the most beautiful blues of the gem kingdom. Sapphire is the gem of truth. The tradition is so strong, we still think of an honest person as "true blue."

Since the word sapphire is synonymous with the color blue, many people don't realize that sapphire comes in other colors, like pink, yellow, and white.

In fact, the two most popular colored gemstones, sapphire and ruby, are twins separated at birth: different colored crystals of the mineral corundum, which comes in every color of the rainbow. When the family connection was discovered, gemologists decided that all the family members would be called sapphire except red, which would still be called ruby.

Sapphire symbolizes fidelity and the soul. In ancient times, a gift of a sapphire was a pledge of trust and loyalty. This tradition makes sapphire a popular choice for engagement rings. Princess Diana is among the many women who followed the sapphire engagement tradition.

Sapphire is the September birthstone, the gem of the fifth and 45th wedding anniversary, and the zodiac gem for Virgo.

Gemvara's blue sapphire is a cerulean blue sapphire from Sri Lanka with cutting so exceptional that it dances with brilliance.

Pink sapphire is even rarer than blue: in some ways it has more in common with ruby than the other colors of sapphire. Gem experts often debate where ruby ends and pink sapphire begins, since pink is really just light red. But the bright pastel shades of pink sapphire, from bubblegum to strawberry, have a candy-colored beauty all their own. They are the most feminine of gems, adding sweetness to delicate styles or a touch of romance to classic tailored designs.

Since most people assume that sapphires are blue, when you wear a yellow sapphire, people are more likely to guess that you are wearing a fancy yellow diamond. For the lucky few who take own one, this gem's understudy status means that yellow sapphire is more affordable than either blue sapphire or yellow diamond.

Yellow sapphire deserves more recognition. Its sunny color is an instant mood-enhancer on the grayest day. Rare and beautiful, yellow sapphire complements yellow gold and takes center stage set when contrasting against white gold and diamonds. Its durability means its beauty will last as long as diamond's too.

Brilliant natural white sapphire also rivals diamond in rarity and beauty, offering the look and lasting value you love for less. Few gems have the beauty, brilliance, and durability of sapphire. It's the perfect choice for jewelry you plan to wear for years and pass along to the next generation.

Sapphire with fine color is so desirable that producers take an extra step after mining and before cutting to make sure that a sapphire has the best hue possible. Before their final polish, most sapphires are heated to almost 2,000 degrees in order to improve the color and clarity. Heat enhancement is stable, does not require special care, and does not reduce the stone's value.

Sapphires are durable and suitable for everyday wear. Clean with mild dish soap: use a soft brush behind the stone where dust can collect.

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